Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning Information

Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning Information

Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning Most people think that you can only drown while you are in water and while this is true, there are two related medical disorders known as “dry” and “secondary” drowning that can occur after the individual has left the water. Dry and secondary drowning are not as common as wet drowning but nevertheless, they still affects a fair number of individuals each year. Dry drowning is by far more common in children than in adults and it may occur when one breathes in water into the lungs. This can occur when one is struggling to swim but it can also occur as a result of getting water in the back of the throat during a playful dunk. In dry drowning, the water does not end up in the lungs. Instead as soon as the water reaches the back of the throat it causes severe spasm of the vocal cords, which shuts of all air to the lungs. Without air, survival is not possible. In secondary drowning the airways remain open and this allows the water to enter and flood the lungs; this prevents oxygen exchange and also makes breathing very difficult. In most cases, symptoms of dry drowning tend to occur soon after any incident involving water. Symptoms of secondary drowning usually take 1-24 hours to develop after the water accident. Fortunately both dry drowning and secondary drowning are rare events. There is no conclusive data being perfectly cataloged but estimates suggest they account for less than 1% of all drowning deaths. Symptoms of Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning The symptoms of dry drowning and...